Two Term Courses

These course meet two out of three terms and earn 10 credits. Students in grades 10-12 seeking permission for Honors work in English and/or history may do so in the first term next year.

Math: Advanced Calculus

This course covers all of the topics of an introductory Calculus course, exploring concepts in depth with a greater emphasis on both the abstract aspects of calculus and its various applications in the real world. Students will be expected to enter the class with a firm grasp of all concepts covered in previous math courses.

 

Prerequisite: Precalculus and departmental permission. Offered at the Honors level only.

Modern Language: Chinese I

This introductory course for Mandarin Chinese is designed for students who have no previous exposure to the language. It stresses the building blocks of spoken and written communication- pronunciation, tones, stroke order and radical recognition. Students will be able to engage in basic daily interactions in Chinese using speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Grammar is introduced incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: introductory greetings, family, dates and time, hobbies, visiting friends, making plans, studying Chinese and school life. Students will also study cultural and historic elements of the Chinese-speaking world. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation. By the end of the first year, students should know approximately 300 words.

Modern Language: French I

This introductory course provides students with the basic skills to read, write, speak and understand introductory-level French. The emphasis of the class is to acquire language through constant exposure to comprehensible input with the use of storytelling and reading. In the second term, the teacher uses French exclusively in class. Vocabulary will be taught communicatively through stories and with some thematic units including greetings, telling time, weather, school, sports, food, making plans, family, and clothing. Grammar will be acquired mainly through listening and reading, although there will be some direct instruction. Students completing this class will be able to comfortably use the present tense of common regular and irregular verbs, articles, subject pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, commands, question formation, possessive adjectives and more.

Modern Language: Spanish I

This introductory course provides students with the basic skills to read, to write, to speak, and to understand introductory-level Spanish. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics discussed include: introductory greetings, friendship, school, sports, leisure activities, food, family, clothing, the home, and health. Grammar is learned incrementally, and the topics introduced include: indefinite and definite articles, subject pronouns, the present tense of regular verbs, the present tense of irregular verbs, adjective agreement and placement, possessive adjectives, direct and indirect objects, and the preterit tense of regular verbs. Students also study aspects of various Spanish-speaking countries. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation.

Performing Arts: Acting - Intermediate

Intermediate Acting continues the actor’s process through warm-up exercises, rehearsal techniques and games, improvisation, and scene work. Students learn to discover their inner resources and use them to inform their acting work. Students’ work will focus on actions and objectives, sense memory, subtext, and character analysis and creation. Individual and group exercises culminate in scene work from comic and dramatic plays.

 

Two Term Course

Prerequisite: Foundations of Theatre or permission of instructor

Open to Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Acting - Scene Study

Scene Study continues to support the actor’s process through warm-up exercises, rehearsal techniques and games; but the focus is on applying techniques to scene work from scripted plays. In Term I, students explore different characters while collaborating closely with other students as actors. After further training in scene work and directing, students can also choose to both direct scenes and act during Term 2. They also continue to analyze dramatic scenes from multiple perspectives. Authors studied include: Lorraine Hansberry, Arthur Miller, Oscar Wilde, and John Patrick Shanley.

 

Two Term Course

Prerequisite: Intermediate Acting  or permission of instructor.

Open to Grade Levels: 11, 12

Performing Arts: Choral - B-Side A Cappella

B-Side A Cappella builds on and further develops the skills learned from A Cappella Foundations while introducing a cappella vocal arranging and improvisation. Students will continue to develop their vocal technique and musicianship while exploring the wider cultural context of the repertoire they study. Throughout the course, they will learn how to work independently in smaller groups and will be given leadership opportunities in weekly rehearsals. The aim of the course is to prepare students to rehearse and perform a cappella vocal music independently and to perform in one public concert each term. This course can be taken more than once. Weekly individual voice lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to their private music lessons.

Two Term Course. Can be taken for 1 Term only if in conjunction with A Cappella Foundations.
Prerequisite: Any Upper School choral ensemble or permission of the instructor.
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Ensemble I

Instrumental Ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). This performing arts course strives to build a strong foundation for the student musician. Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills. The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Students should be capable of playing their instrument independently with at least one full year of private lessons and/or ensemble experience. Students who are new to Beaver will be contacted by a faculty member prior to the beginning of the school year to ensure proper ensemble placement. Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Two Term Course
Prerequisite: One year experience with private lessons and/or ensemble experience.
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Ensemble II

The Instrumental Ensemble II course builds on and further develops the skills introduced in Instrumental Ensemble I. This ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills.The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year.Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Two Term Course
Prerequisite: Instrumental Ensemble I, Ikonoclastic or placement audition
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Music - Chroma

Chroma is an ensemble that offers the advanced instrumentalist an in-depth study of large ensemble works across a wide range of repertoire. This ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). Students will study and play a wide range of intermediate and advanced repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes custom arrangements, taking components from the classical music tradition as well as contemporary styles such as pop and jazz as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, and rehearsal/performance skills.The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Two Term Course
Prerequisite: Instrumental Ensemble II, Ikonoclastic or placement audition.
Open to Grade Levels: 11, 12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Music - Cuban Ensemble

In this course students will specialize in and learn a variety of Afro-Cuban Jazz Standards. They will explore Cuban culture and history to gain a greater understanding of the evolution of Cuban music and its relationship and impact on North American jazz. The course includes in a 8-day long trip to Havana, Cuba which will take place during the first week of spring break in March 2021. Once in Cuba, students will attend “Escuela Nacional de Arte” a prestigious music school in Havana. In addition to honing their music skills, students will participate in rehearsals with the Cuban conservatory students while making cross-cultural and historical connections. Auditions are open for the following instruments: Bass, Drums, Percussion, Guitar, Piano, Strings, Brass and Woodwinds. This ensemble performs three formal concerts and at some additional school forums. Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Three Term Class – G Block
Prerequisite: Audition
Open to grade levels: 11, 12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Music - Jazz Combo

This course offers the advanced instrumentalist an in-depth study of jazz performance. This ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). While playing a range of jazz repertoire, students will apply theory and learn strategies for interpreting and soloing over standard jazz chord changes. They will develop skills with swing phrasing, articulation, sight reading, and idiomatic ensemble traditions. Rhythm section instrumentalist (piano, guitar, bass and drums) will learn how to independently develop a range of instrument-specific parts for standard jazz repertoire. Students will build jazz vocabulary and develop their own voice as improvisers. The ensemble will perform in mandatory concerts throughout the year. Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Two Term Course
Prerequisite: Instrumental Ensemble II, Ikonoclastic or placement audition.
Open to Grade Levels: 11,12

Visual Arts: Senior Studio

Culminating with the annual Senior Show, this class creates the community, structure, and space for the most serious artists to pursue their own work. Students taking this class have shown to be independent, dedicated artists who are prepared to bring their own personal interests to the class. No projects are assigned. Group critiques, research in contemporary art, readings, and documentation of the creative process will be major elements of the course.
Prerequisite: Open to 12th graders per recommendation by the Visual Art Department.
12th graders must take both terms.

Visual Arts: Studio Practice

This class creates the community, structure, and space for the most serious artists to pursue their own work. Students taking this class have shown to be independent, dedicated artists who are prepared to bring their own personal interests to the class. No projects are assigned. Group critiques, research in contemporary art, readings, and documentation of the creative process will be major elements of the course.
Prerequisite: Open to 10th and 11th graders per recommendation by the Visual Art Department.
10th and 11th grades can take one or two terms.


One Term Courses

These courses meet one term, Fall, Winter, or Spring and earn 5 credits each. English and History students seeking Honors designation sign contracts in the first term of next year to earn that credit.

BVR-X: Game Design

What makes a great game? The right balance of strategy and luck? A compelling story and an immersive experience? Unique rules and mechanics? In this course, after analyzing successful board games, card games, and video games, students will generate their own ideas and create virtual and/or physical prototypes. Storytelling, coding, graphic design, artificial intelligence, and systems thinking will all be incorporated within this course.

Open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders – Prerequisites: None

BVR-X: Intro to Entrepreneurship

This entrepreneurship course will go beyond teaching students how to start a new business. We will focus on learning how to be entrepreneurial as a dispositional skill for the 21st century. Together, we will explore the power behind critical thinking and the transformative nature of starting something. This course provides learners with the space to rethink their strengths, motivation, and strategies to launch projects to change the world within and around them. Joining this course is making a commitment to stop talking about our ideas and start putting them into action.

Open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders
Prerequisites: None

BVR-X: Intro to Psychology

Do you know why you think, feel and believe your thoughts, feelings and beliefs? This course will aim to give you a deeper understanding of human behavior by studying both theories and research findings in psychology. We’ll look at key ideas that are fundamental to the field and also explore recent advances and unanswered questions. Topics may include cognitive bias, the “nature versus nurture” debate, false memories, group dynamics and personality disorders.

Open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders – Prerequisites: None

BVR-X: Introduction to Investing

Should you invest in the common stock of Apple Inc. or Exxon Mobil? How do you decide whether to get a car loan or a lease? How do you determine how much a small business is worth? In this course, we will learn about (a) the fundamentals of the stock market, investment vehicles, and basic principles of investing, (b) key aspects of personal finance, including budgeting, credit cards, and investing for retirement, and (c) the time value of money and risk as it applies to analyzing these personal finance questions. Students will learn to create and maintain a diversified portfolio through a virtual stock exchange, and there will be opportunities for research and other projects based on student interest.

Open to 11th and 12th graders
Prerequisites: None

BVR-X: Project Lab

Got ideas? Awesome! This is the class for you. This BVR-X course will focus on your ideas, what you want to discuss, research, design, and create. Come build your program and explore what you want to learn. No limits.

Open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders – Prerequisites: None

BVR-X: Sustainable Design

Engineers, architects and designers are finding new ways to reduce consumption, minimize waste, use renewable resources and even create solutions that have a net positive impact on the environment. In this course, we’ll identify situations where sustainable design can be most effective. You’ll learn about successful examples such as cook stoves that dramatically reduce fuel consumption and green buildings that generate more energy than they use.

Open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders – Prerequisites: None

English: Contemporary Poetry

The word “poetry” conjures up, for many, the likes of Sappho, Chaucer, Basho, and Whitman; not everyone, though, is aware of the present state of the genre. In this class, we will discuss our preconceived notions of poetry, deconstruct those notions, and collectively define what it means to be a poet in the new millennium. Today’s poetry landscape is populated with an incredibly broad range of styles, forms, tones, influences, and subject matters. By reading and hearing poets like Eduardo Corral, Juan Felipe Herrera, Aja Monet, Rupi Kaur, Rudy Francisco, and Danez Smith, you will find proof that language, used precisely and thoughtfully, can achieve many different goals. In addition to reading and analyzing samples from the spectrum of contemporary poetry, you will write and workshop your own poems. A willingness to take risks, to read each night, and to take an active role in class discussion is required.

English: Ethics in Literature

How do we make good decisions? What do we factor into these decisions? Stakeholders? Consequences? We read about characters who are faced with these dilemmas constantly, and rarely do they make decisions that fully consider all angles of the situation at hand. In this class, we will explore texts through different theoretical lenses, from utilitarianism to deontology, care ethics to virtue ethics. Discussion will help us to collectively reconsider the choices that these characters make—what they did right and where they went wrong. Coursework will also include analytical writing, debate, simulation, and case studies that will push us to think comprehensively as to whom our decisions most greatly affect. Together we will use the moral conundrums of characters in literature and film as opportunities to better examine our own ethical decision making.

English: Great Books

When was the last time you were responsible for picking your reading for a course? At the beginning of this class, you will generate a list of books you want to read, and then you will campaign for your favorite; after the campaign season ends, you’ll vote, and several books will win. We’ll spend the term reading them, examining them for character, theme, structure, style, and message. How does choosing the text intersect with investment in the reading? Is the text a great book? Ultimately, you decide whether the books deserve spots on the shelf and how you go about choosing your next read. You will respond to the reading in various forms of writing, class discussions, projects, and presentations.

Previous winners: 1984, Lolita, Brave New World, Catch 22, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Lord of the Flies, Scarlet Letter, On the Road, The Kite Runner, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

English: Literature and Film

Did you like the movie or the book better? Is this a sensible question, or are we being asked to compare unlike genres? In this course we will investigate these two art forms, comparing the narrative possibilities — and limitations — of each. How do these modes of storytelling differ in terms of their effects? What can film achieve that a novel or play cannot, and vice versa? What is lost in the translation of literature into film, and what makes a “good” adaptation? We will read two novels and a play closely, and we will study a film based on each. You will think and write critically about how these stories are told on the printed page and on the screen.

English: Money, Money, Money

What is money’s place in society? Why do so many students say that The Great Gatsby inspired them more than any other text? What other stories use money — or the lack thereof — as a central theme? What is the connection between money and power? What is revealed about inequity in society? What messages are sent, reinforced, and challenged? What happens when the whole system explodes? In this class you’ll read fiction and non-fiction, write, watch, and listen; and question, research, collaborate, and present.

English: Science Fiction

In the 1960’s, American literature experienced a formidable boom in science fiction writing. The complicated politics of the time led to “The New Wave,” a literary age of up-and-coming writers addressing America’s more contentious social and political events through the medium of science fiction. Future literary giants like Kurt Vonnegut, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula Le Guin, among many others, began incorporating science fiction modes and techniques into their novels to further dissect this phenomenon we call existence. With the advent of new film technologies, Hollywood caught on to the wave and began producing America’s first big-budget, full-length science fiction movies. After studying “The New Wave,” we will look to more recent Science Fiction studying 2 books and 4 films. We will also focus on philosophy, as Science Fiction writers/filmmakers are often philosophizing about the future of our species and the societies we’ve built.

English: Short Stories

How does something so small pack such a big punch? Such is the nature of a short story. You’ll hone in on story elements by investigating a variety of stories and writers.  Everyone has a story to tell. You’ll experiment with turning your own stories into short fiction, and you will continue to develop analytical essay writing skills.

English: Songbook: My Beautiful, Dark Twisted Butterfly: Albums as Literature

Have you ever heard a song that evoked an emotional response in ways that you could not describe? Have you ever considered why strings in a pop song always take it up a slight level? Do you ever ponder how Kanye West’s chipmunk funk sparked an era of good feelings in hip-hop? If so, you’re ready to dissect some of music’s most profound works. Using the format of podcast, we will examine albums, including Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy and Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly. Additionally, you will develop the skills and ability to create your own serialized podcast that examines an iconic album of your choice. In this, we will discuss and deconstruct lyrics, samples, instrumentation, cultural context, and musical and literary allusions within the works. We will leave this class not only enjoying music but learning how to read an album as one would read a book.

Global History: Advanced Honors - Independent Research

An intensive, inquiry-based course that will require students to pursue an advanced independent course of research on a topic of their choice. Students in this small section will be expected to work through a number of multi-step research assignments that will include producing research based papers, research based presentations, and participate in a number of research challenges and research projects.  This course is designed to hone the research skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, analysis, and dissemination and is designed for the student who is interested in possibly pursuing advanced humanities research in college.

Limit per class: 12 students.

Global History: Advanced Honors - Theories of Punishment

What aspects of culture and politics promote criminal justice reform? How can the United States achieve an effective justice system that protects public safety while also confronting issues related to restoration for those impacted by crime, both the victim and the accused? Is the prison industrial complex used by the government and industry to address social, political and economic challenges? In this course, students are introduced to criminology and penology.  Students will examine historical trends, current programs related to reform, and examine the psychological impact and role that poverty, lack of mental health services, addiction, trauma, and education has had on the lives of incarcerated people. They will participate in forums led by people whose work or volunteerism is connected to addressing existing issues within the system and engage in field-based experiences. Students will explore topics of choice and design viable solutions.

Global History: Governments From Around the World

How do governments of the world work together in dealing with geopolitical issues? This course will explore the various governmental systems of the world in existence today. It will also examine why democracy thrives in some areas of the world and what factors hinder it in others. Over the course of a term, students will be exposed to governmental systems from all corners of the globe. Ultimately, through those explorations, students will critically engage with global contemporary issues and the challenges associated with the various governments in existence.

Global History: Illusions and Delusions - the 20th Century

How have ideas of the 20th century revolutionized humanity? This class will examine different theories and innovations that influenced and shaped the 20th century in science, technology, culture and literature, and politics. How have ideas with seemingly positive implications led to negative consequences? In order to make sense of today’s cultural, political, and economic environment, this class will explore how 20th century ideas set the stage for our current times.

Global History: Moral Dilemmas - The challenge of making (the right) decisions

Have you ever wondered if a decision you made was the right one? Every day, we are faced with taking a stand on difficult moral questions. But, why do we think our opinion is morally right? In this course, you will get to critically analyze situations that affect us every day, from social media to gender and sexuality and from profiling to hating sports teams, among many topics. Be prepared to tackle challenging, real-life situations, collaborate to propose alternative solutions and perspectives, understand how our brain makes decisions, and rethink your notion of morality, right and wrong, and what we ought to do.

Global History: Race, Class, and Identity

How have we been socialized to perpetuate stereotypes and biases toward groups of people? How do gender and identity intersect with race and class? Students will examine the work of some of the most important thinkers on race, class consciousness, and identity. Students will be encouraged to engage in authentic, personal discussions and to connect their experiences to other global voices.

Global History: Revolutionary Times

What is the reason behind major ideological and cultural revolutions? In this course, you will explore some of the most revolutionary events and ideas of their time, from the Renaissance to the Arab Spring and current day revolutions. You will analyze how people’s ideas and actions have transformed society, sometimes unintentionally, and the long-lasting global impact of these transformations. You will discuss the role of those revolutionary ideas and actions in provoking political change. You will compare and contrast their philosophical origins and political legacies and assess their achievements against their goals.

Global History: The Media and Its Influences

From the printing press to widespread use of social media, the creation of news content has been defined and redefined by the technology of its historical time. Using today’s media landscape, students will examine what qualifies as news, what ethical questions are presented in journalism, and how we are impacted today by those that craft, manipulate, and distribute the message. Students will use different media tools and platforms to question, challenge, and deconstruct media messages and their biases. Students will become better equipped to read the world and understand the news.

Global History: Theories of Justice

Is economic inequality unjust? Is the government justified in restricting your freedom if it does so to improve your life? Using philosophical ideas by which one might understand justice, students will engage in discussion, debate, and a series of project-based learning activities as they examine complex problems and develop solutions to issues that challenge some of their perspectives on fairness and the meaning of societal justice. In this course, students will explore a range of topics related to affirmative action, drug policy, corporate social responsibility, and distributive justice.

Math: Calculus - Derivatives

This course includes all of the topics of an introductory Calculus course including limits, derivatives and their applications.

 

Prerequisite: Precalculus and departmental permission. Honors level requires departmental permission.

Math: Calculus - Integrals

This course includes all of the topics of an introductory Calculus course including definite integrals, indefinite integrals and their applications.

 

Prerequisite: Calculus – Derivatives and departmental permission. Honors level requires departmental permission.

Math: Introduction to Game Theory

Game Theory is a branch of applied mathematics that is used to evaluate various social conditions. Students in this course will learn about the mathematics behind social and strategic situations. This course will focus on topics ranging from game strategy to problems of cooperation in everyday life. Case studies in resource depletion, global warming and conflict negotiation will be included. Student work will apply theory to real strategic environments.

 

Open to 11th and 12th graders or by departmental approval.

Math: Precalculus - Functions

In this course, students will take a deeper look at various families of functions: rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, parametric and polynomial. Students will learn about the ways in which domain, range, continuity, inverses, composition and transformation apply to those functions. Students will also have opportunities to analyze real-world data and generate predictive models. Topics from discrete math are often included in this course, as well.

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry. Offered at the Honors and Standard levels. Honors level requires departmental permission.

Math: Precalculus - Trigonometry

Students in this course will learn about angle measurement, periodic behavior, and a range of applications related to both right triangle and circular trigonometry. Analytic geometry and polar coordinates are often included in this course, as well. Prerequisites: Algebra II and Geometry. Honors level requires departmental permission.

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry. Offered at the Honors and Standard levels. Honors level requires departmental permission.

Math: Statistics

This course includes the gathering of data and a variety of sampling techniques, hypothesis testing, frequency distribution, normal distribution, correlation, linear regression, theoretical distributions, and inferential statistics. This course asks students to consider questions such as these: How is data summarized so that it is intelligible? How should statistical data be interpreted? How can we measure the inherent uncertainty built into statistical data? Students will be asked to collect, analyze and interpret real data to answer real questions in their areas of interest.

 

Open to 11th and 12th graders or by departmental approval.

Modern Language: Advanced Chinese

In Advanced Chinese, students will continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater autonomy with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Grammar is studied incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: dining, shopping, asking for and giving directions, and expressing opinions. Students will study the culture and diversity of the Chinese-speaking world in the form of culturally rich images, videos, music, and some authentic texts. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, skits and presentations foster student interaction and participation.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Intermediate Chinese skills. Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Health & Environment: Students will explore topics including individuals’ wellbeing, exercise, nutrition, access to healthcare, and the interrelationships between human activity and the natural as well as built environmental changes.

Learning Chinese Through Media: Through various sources of Chinese media including authentic images, students will learn to discuss new topics from popular culture in China to globalization. Students will also gain more understanding of regional cultural differences in Chinese speaking areas.

Health & Environment: Students will explore topics including individuals’ wellbeing, exercise, nutrition, access to healthcare, and the interrelationships between human activity and the natural as well as human-made environmental changes.

Modern Language: Advanced French

Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Intermediate French skills and Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

The Francophone World: Québec of today and Yesterday:In this class, students will explore Quebec’s rich history and culture. Students will use literature, current events, film, music and other resources to learn about the region of Quebec. This course will explore themes including La Révolution Tranquille, Quebecois identity today, Quebec’s indigenous population, Quebec’s relation to France today and yesterday. The course will also look at Quebec today as well as explore Quebec’s future. Students will read excerpts by Quebecois writers including Michel Tremblay, Wajdi Mouawad. This class will be taught entirely in French.

Revolutions: France, Haiti and Beyond:This course will look at Revolutions across the Francophone world and their effects on national identity. We will begin with the enlightenment philosophy that fueled the French Revolution and other revolutions since. We will look at significant moments in and the causes and aftermaths of the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution and other revolts and revolutions across the Francophone world. We will look at these revolutions through different lenses using a variety of primary and secondary sources, from official documents to novels, plays, movies and more. The class will also address current conflicts happening in the Francophone world such as in Mali and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Modern Language: Advanced Spanish

Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Intermediate Spanish skills and Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Environments in Crisis: This course focuses on current environmental challenges across Latin America. Students will be encouraged to analyze the connections between the social contexts and contemporary environmental crises. Through case studies, students will explore the interrelationships between human activity and environmental change. The topics to be studied will include the destruction of the rainforest, water pollution, exploitation of natural resources, habitat destruction and endangered species. Students will examine how social media, community engagement, and advocacy initiatives have played key roles in the positive outcomes of environmental problems.

Social Justice in Latin America: In this course, students will investigate the key social justice issues facing the Spanish-speaking populations of the Americas. We will examine struggles for equity among various groups, including indigenous populations, political dissidents, and the poor and disenfranchised. Using a variety of authentic sources from the media, such as news articles, documentaries, music, literature and poetry, we will compare and contrast the multiple perspectives of people of Latin American descent. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding and express their opinions in discussions, essays and projects. One of the goals of this course is for students to understand the societal forces that shape the beliefs and attitudes of diverse groups of people.

Modern-Day Colombia: While discovering what Colombia is like today economically, socially, and culturally, students will gain a better understanding of the country as a whole from different angles. Some of the topics that will be studied are music and regionalism, waves of immigration, faces of the political arena, soccer and Los Dos Escobares, Gabriel García Márquez, El Bogotazo, and more. Students will research and learn about the drastic changes that have taken place in the last twenty years, especially in regions like Medellín, that have revamped and revived Colombia as it stands today.

Current Events:This course aims at improving your knowledge and understanding of Latin American cultures. The goal is to enhance your awareness and understanding of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. The course is organized by themes based on contemporary social, political and cultural issues of Spanish-speaking societies. Class activities will consist of discussions, oral and written reports, and debates, emphasizing problem-solving and respect for the opinions of others. This course uses a large selection of materials. We will use movies, the Internet, newspapers, readings, and radio programs that will be discussed during the semester and upon which class activities are based.

Modern Language: Foundations of Chinese

Foundations of Chinese builds on students’ basic proficiency established in Chinese I. Students may enroll in this course having demonstrated proficiency equivalent to completion of a full-year high school course. This course will continue to develop students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Grammar is studied incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: hobbies, weather, dining, celebrations, shopping and asking for directions. Students will continue to study the culture of the Chinese-speaking world in the form of language use, traditions and current events. Audio and video materials along with computer software, games, projects, and presentations will be used to foster student interaction and participation.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Chinese I skills and Departmental RecommendationRequired.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Friends from the Start: Students will learn vocabulary related to background information, hobbies, leisure time and celebrations.

Everyday Life: Students will get a chance to compare their life to that of teens in China and around the world today. By the end of the term, students should be comfortable describing their daily lives, from routines and schedules, to hobbies and habits.

Family and Home: Students will discuss the elements that comprise a home,  as well as one’s circle of care. Additionally, students will learn about Chinese familial structures and compare and contrast their lives to those of Chinese teens.

Modern Language: Foundations of French

In Foundations of French, students will continue to develop their language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Vocabulary will be taught through stories and accessible texts chosen around the themes of each one-term class. The class will be driven by comprehensible input; in other words, listening and reading that is understandable. Through readings and research students will also expand their cultural understanding of France and the Francophone world. Students completing this class will be able to comfortably use verbs in the passé composé and imperfect, direct and indirect pronouns, reflexive verbs, some relative pronouns and negative expressions. Students will show the language that they can produce creatively through writing assignments, videos and projects.
Prerequisites: French 1 or equivalent and Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

The Marketplace: Students will develop their oral and written skills in French as they learn about the buying and selling of goods in the French speaking world. From groceries and clothing to hotels and restaurants, students will learn to barter, compare and contrast. Students will learn vocabulary related to groceries, ingredients and cooking. They will also learn about typical prepared foods that can be found in the marketplaces of francophone countries.

Social Life: Students will learn how to get to know people better through more in-depth conversations about their backgrounds and interests. They will practice necessary skills and vocabulary to plan outings, pay visits, or invite friends over for homemade meals.

Cuisine & Culture: Students will learn vocabulary related to groceries, ingredients and the kitchen. They will learn different expressions as well as units of measurement used in Francophone countries. They will also learn about the typical gastronomy of different countries.

Modern Language: Foundations of Spanish

In this course, students will continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way. The grammatical topics discussed include: the present progressive tense, direct and indirect object pronouns, estar + adjectives, reflexive verbs, verbs like gustar, comparatives and superlatives, the imperfect tense and the preterite tense. Students will study the culture of the Spanish-speaking world in the form of language use, customs, celebrations, art, historical figures, and current contributors to Latin American and Spanish society.
Prerequisites: Spanish 1 or equivalent and Departmental Recommendation Required.

Social Life: Students will study vocabulary related to family, friends and social life in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will build their communication skills as they tell stories about family and friends.

Cuisine & Culture: Students will learn vocabulary related to groceries, ingredients and the kitchen. They will learn different expressions as well as units of measurement used in Spanish-speaking countries. They will also learn about the typical gastronomy of different countries.

Customs and Celebrations: In this course, students will explore different traditions and celebrations practiced in Spanish-speaking countries. They will also learn to talk about their own customs in their families and from their childhood. This course focuses on traditions and customs of Mexico, as well as one of its famous artists, Frida Kahlo, reading a level-appropriate biography in Spanish.

Travel & Tourism: In this course, students will explore what it means to travel with a purpose. Discussions and resources will cover topics such as: supporting the local economy, keeping an open mind, and educating oneself about the cultural traditions and practices of the host community.  

Home Life: In this course, students read a novel called Bianca Nieves y sus siete toritos, which is about the life of a girl growing up in Spain whose father is a torero. They learn to understand Bianca’s complicated home life. In addition, students learn about different cultural aspects of Spain, including, but not limited to family life, and the controversy around bullfighting.

Modern Language: Intermediate Chinese

In Intermediate Chinese, students continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater autonomy with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Grammar is studied incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: making recommendations, giving directions, expressing doubt and certainty, and expressing opinions. Students will study the culture and diversity of the Chinese-speaking world in the form of culturally rich images, videos, music, and some authentic texts. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, skits and presentations foster student interaction and participation.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of Chinese skills and Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Home, School and Work: Students will learn to talk about their life at home, school and their plans for their future education and careers. They will learn the necessary vocabulary to express their likes and dislikes concerning their present life, education and future goals.

Meeting Our Needs: Students will discover vocabulary related to people’s feelings, physical and mental states, courses of actions and routines. They will also learn about people’s lifestyles and customs in China and other Chinese-speaking regions.

Social Life: Students will learn how to get to know people better through more in-depth conversations about their backgrounds and interests. They will practice necessary skills and vocabulary to plan outings, pay visits, or invite friends over for homemade meals.

Modern Language: Intermediate French

In Intermediate French, students will improve their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater autonomy with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Vocabulary is acquired through exposure to authentic texts and communicative practice, and the topics that are explored include: making recommendations, expressing doubt and certainty, and expressing opinions. Students will learn a few more tenses while refining their written and oral communication. The class will use more authentic texts and documents from the Francophone world to guide both language learning and discussions. Students will study culture and diversity in the form of current events, film, music, and famous novels and stories.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of French skills and Departmental Recommendation Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

France: A Nation of Regions: As a country, France is known for, among many other things, its cheese and gastronomy; but each dish and each cheese comes from its own distinct region. What makes a country roughly the size of Texas have so many distinct regions with their own distinct cultures? In this class we will look at the regions of France and see what makes them unique and proud including gastronomy, art, poetry, music, literature and history. We will look at the French idea of terroir and why the foods from one area are unique to that area and cannot be reproduced elsewhere. The class will also look at how the French government and the regions themselves attempt to preserve their cultural heritage in the face of a changing world and globalization.

Action and Romance: This course will use the abbreviated version of the classic play “Cyrano de Bergerac.” The story will act as a starting point, allowing students to build mastery in the future and conditional tenses by reworking and re-imagining the tale. Additionally, students will be exposed to new tenses and review the past tense.

Place & Identity: Students will explore cultural identity and how it is related to place. We will look at themes such as immigration and rural vs urban environments. Students will look at a variety of authentic sources that explore places and the people that inhabit them including Butterfly in the City and Jean de Florette, as well as representations of place and identity in poetry and music. Finally, we will look at how places have influenced and been represented in art.

Modern Language: Intermediate Spanish

In Intermediate Spanish, students continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater independence with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Vocabulary is acquired in a thematic and communicative way, and the grammatical topics that are practiced include: preterite and imperfect, familiar, formal and nosotros commands, future and conditional, present subjunctive. Students also study the culture of the Spanish-speaking world in the form of authentic literature, historical and literary figures, customs, celebrations, and music. Audio and video materials, Skype conferences, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of Spanish skills and Departmental Recommendation Required.

Health & Wellness: In this course, students will explore health-related topics including cultural context of food, access to healthcare, physical exercise, emotional well-being, and the importance of meditation and maintaining a healthy balance with technology. Through the novel that students read called Vida o muerte en el Cusco, students learn about medical emergencies, as well as what it is like to travel through Peru. 

Identity in the 21st Century: In this course, students will explore their identities in the past, present, and future. They will do this by working with various themes such as important events in one’s past, dreams for the future, and communicating identity,  as they establish what it means to be an individual in the 21st century.

Urban Life: In this course, students will explore various aspects of life in the city. Students will examine how topics such as pollution, accessibility, and migration shape urban settings. Students will also reflect on the causes and consequences of gentrification around the world and in our local communities

Storytelling: In this course, students will explore aspects of storytelling including short stories, journalism, poetry, and oral histories and the art of the interview.

 Contemporary Artists of the Spanish-Speaking World: In this course, students will explore art through various modes such as music and visual art produced by contemporary Spanish-speaking artists. They will work closely with these works and use them to develop their own artistic voice. 

Performing Arts: Acting - Advanced Theater

Advanced Theater is a one-term, process-to-production course designed to prepare students for two public performances at Beaver. The course begins by focusing on script analysis and character development and then students engage in the rehearsal process to bring the play to fruition with the Advanced Design & Tech and Costume Design classes. Acting roles are open to seniors who have completed all prerequisites. Students entering this class should be highly motivated and interested in an intense and exciting experience that requires a great deal of commitment. Recent productions include, Stop Kiss, The Heidi Chronicles, Distracted, The Shape of Things, Durango, and The Wooden Heart.

One Term Course
Prerequisites: Acting: Scene Study or permission of the instructor
Open to Grade Levels: 12

Performing Arts: Advanced Costume Design

Advanced Costume Design is a one-term, process-to-production course designed to prepare students for the role of Costume Designer or Draper for the Advanced Theater Production. Students will begin with script analysis and design and then work with a production team to bring the play to fruition with the Advanced Theater Acting and Design & Tech classes. Students entering this class should be highly motivated and interested in an exciting experience that requires a great deal of commitment. Recent productions include Durango and The Wooden Heart.

One Term Course 
Prerequisites: Costume and Fashion Design Studio or permission of the instructor.
Open to Grade Levels: 12

Performing Arts: Beginning Guitar/Piano

Have you always wanted to learn how to play the guitar or piano? Did you teach yourself how to play a few chords, but want to take the next step? This practical, non-performance based course is designed for students with little to no previous guitar/piano experience. After choosing to focus on either piano or guitar, essential skills are taught in a fun, supportive setting that allows students to develop at their own pace. The idea is to get you playing right away. By the end of the course, you will be able to play simple simple pieces, including songs that you choose yourself. This course can be taken more than once.

One Term Course
No prerequisite
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Choral - A Cappella Foundations

A Cappella Foundations will introduce students to the fundamentals of a cappella singing, including vocal technique, music literacy, and artistic expression. Students will also cultivate a working knowledge of fundamental music theory and explore the wider cultural context of the repertoire they study. Throughout the course, students will learn how to listen for tuning and ensemble blend during rehearsal. The aim of the course is to develop confident musicians and prepare for a public concert at the end of the term. Weekly individual voice lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to their private music lessons.

One Term Course
Prerequisite: No prerequisite
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Choral - B-Side A Cappella

B-Side A Cappella builds on and further develops the skills learned from A Cappella Foundations while introducing a cappella vocal arranging and improvisation. Students will continue to develop their vocal technique and musicianship while exploring the wider cultural context of the repertoire they study. Throughout the course, they will learn how to work independently in smaller groups and will be given leadership opportunities in weekly rehearsals. The aim of the course is to prepare students to rehearse and perform a cappella vocal music independently and to perform in one public concert each term. This course can be taken more than once. Weekly individual voice lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to their private music lessons.

Two Term Course. Can be taken for 1 Term only if in conjunction with A Cappella Foundations.
Prerequisite: Any Upper School choral ensemble or permission of the instructor.
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Technical Theater - Advanced Design & Tech

Advanced Design & Tech is a one-term, process-to-production course designed to prepare students for 2 public performances at Beaver. The course begins by focusing on script analysis and design, and then students work as theatre technicians and designers to bring the play to fruition with the Advanced Theater Acting and Costume Design classes. Technical theater roles encompass areas such as stage management, set, light and sound design as well as technical direction and engineering and running crews. Students entering this class should be highly motivated and interested in an intense and exciting experience that requires a great deal of commitment. Recent productions include Durango and The Wooden Heart.

One Term Course
Prerequisites: Design & Tech Studio or permission of the instructor.
Open to Grade Levels: 12

Performing Arts: Technical Theater - Mainstage Design Independent Study

Mainstage Design Independent Study is a course for students with experience in Theatrical Design who are ready to design or assistant design on a mainstage production at Beaver. Students will learn about and utilize design, rendering tools, and communication strategies while gaining an assistant designer or designer resume credit. The successful student would practice skills and strategies related to communication, planning, and collaboration, as well as exercise creative thinking and problem solving methods essential to producing a theatrical design. Students taking this course must also take the Technical Theater Afternoon Activity in the same term. This course can be taken more than once.

 

One Term Course

Prerequisite Tech Theater – Design & Tech Studio and permission of instructor.

Performing Arts: The Actors' Showcase

This workshop is designed for the enthusiastic actor developing his/her craft. It will focus on audition material for college and theatre opportunities beyond Beaver. The course will give students an opportunity to prepare audition monologues as well as explore dramatic structure and topical themes through contemporary scene work. This course is for both the dedicated and independent drama student and students that wish to explore drama for the first time. This course will culminate in a showcase in the Black Box at the end of the term.

 

One Term Course

No Prerequisites.

Open to Grade Levels: 11, 12

Science: Advanced Biology - Anatomy and Physiology

In this lab-based course, we will explore the integrated systems that make up the incredible human body and learn about how the structures of the body perform the functions necessary to maintain the balance of life (homeostasis). Students will continue to investigate the relationship between structure and function through dissections, projects, and discussions. We will look into the pathophysiology of diseases and disorders that compromise the functioning of our body systems and visit Harvard Medical School MedScience program once a week to apply this content to hands-on medical simulations and skill labs. 

Prerequisites: Biology Foundations and anyChem or Bio Applications course and with departmental permission.
***Open ONLY to students who have NOT attended the Harvard HMS Summer simulation program.

Science: Advanced Chemistry – Organic Chemistry

Organic molecules are the building blocks of all life on Earth, and the carbon atom is central to the formation of all organic molecules. The importance of chemistry in biological systems will be the focus of the course, and modern biological topics will be explored. The course will investigate the properties and functions of several categories of organic molecules including alcohols, acids, and ethers. The synthesis and decomposition of synthetic and biological molecules will be performed in the lab. Experiments will include synthesizing and purifying aspirin, extracting caffeine from tea, and examining the properties and behaviors of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates as organic compounds.

Prerequisites: Any Chemistry Applications course. Departmental permission required. Offered at the Honors level only.

Science: Advanced Engineering Design - Project Studio (Honors)

This course is intended to give students a more challenging and demanding environment to apply the skills they learned in either Engineering Design Foundations or at NuVu and allow them to continue to wrestle and build on solutions to real problems. This course is largely project-based, and students will be expected to use the time to research and design solutions to engineering design challenges. All projects will be student-led.In addition to learning and using the tools and approaches of the engineering studio and mindset.

Open to 11th and 12th graders.
Prerequisites: Engineering Design Foundations: Tools and Process or NuVu. Departmental permission required. Offered at the Honors level only.

Science: Advanced Physics – Electricity & Magnetism

Advanced Electricity and Magnetism is an extension of the skills and concepts learned in Conceptual Physics. These concepts will be more rigorously explored and use more sophisticated mathematical tools than were used freshman year (geometry, trigonometry, functions, pre-calculus, and some calculus). The goal is to develop tools and intuition capable of describing the physical world at a very general level. The topics studied during this term include electricity, electrostatics and electric fields, magnetic fields, and the interplay between electric and magnetic fields. This course is extensively laboratory based while developing the theoretical ideas of an introductory college physics course. Students will be required to draw conclusions based on evidence gathered with such devices as batteries, bulbs, capacitors, wires, hand generators, and motors. If time allows, the course may also include electromagnetic radiation (light, x-rays, microwaves, etc.) as an extension.

 

Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics A and B or equivalent and departmental permission. Offered at the Honors level only.

Science: Advanced Physics – Mechanics

Advanced Mechanics is an extension of the skills and concepts learned in Conceptual Physics. These concepts will be more rigorously explored and use much more sophisticated mathematical tools than were used freshman year (geometry, trigonometry, functions, pre-calculus, and some calculus). The goal is to develop tools and intuition capable of describing the physical world at a very general level. The topics studied during this term can be tailored to student interest but will likely draw from a list of topics including accelerated motion, vectors and projectile motion, Newton’s Laws, 2-D statics and dynamics, rotational motion, torque, and special relativity. This course includes at least one large research project in which students are required to explore a topic of interest and use their mechanics knowledge to analyze and make calculation-supported predictions for a physical situation.

 

Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics A and B or equivalent and departmental permission. Offered at the Honors level only.

Science: Biology Applications - DNA and Genetics

DNA is often referred to as the “code of life”. This course seeks to explore what we know about how our bodies interpret and utilize our genetic code and how our understanding has changed in recent years. Included in this course will be discussions of DNA structure, function, and replication. In addition, students will be introduced to laboratory techniques that have driven our understanding of these topics, including DNA extraction, gel electrophoresis, PCR, and bacterial transformation. Emphasis on effective communication of experimental design and findings through primary source research, formal reports and presentations will also be an integral part of this course.

Prerequisites: Biology Foundations. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Biology Applications - Ecology and Systems

Ecology is all about relationships and interconnections. In this course, students will focus on the interdependence of living organisms (biotic factors) and their environment (abiotic factors) and how energy flows through Earth’s systems and connects us to all living things. Topics covered in this course include photosynthesis, cellular respiration, nutrient cycles, water quality, and ecological principles. In addition, students will be asked to critically consider the relationship between humans and the environment and explore the impacts we have on living systems. All of this will be done through the lens of a term-long aquaponics design project. Throughout the design process, students will think critically about the political, geographic, and economic challenges of food systems and connect their lessons learned to the larger global community. This course integrates concepts from biology, ecology, environmental justice, coding and engineering.

Prerequisites: Biology Foundations. Honors level with departmental permission.

Science: Biology Applications - Neuroscience

The most basic function of the brain is to keep you alive. Your 100 billion neurons regulate breathing, heart rate, hunger and sleep cycle. But perhaps what fascinates us the most about the human brain is how it goes beyond these basic functions and generates emotions, perceptions, and thoughts that guide behavior. In this course, we will take a deep dive into brain science, exploring everything from the biochemistry of a neuron, to the latest research on psychological disorders such as depression and addiction. Topics in this course include anatomy and physiology, synaptic transmission, neuroscience, perception and learning, behavior and cognition, and psychology.

Prerequisites: Biology Foundations. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Biology Foundations - The Structure & Function of Life

From the development of antibiotics to solar panels, the living world has provided countless solutions to the most challenging problems we have faced as a human race. This course will give students the opportunity to learn about the fundamentals of life, from the whole organism down to the molecular level. In this course, we will focus on a deeper understanding of the biological concepts of biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, evolution, and comparative anatomy and physiology. This lab based science course will further develop scientific writing skills and help incorporate strategies to process and understand complex biological concepts.

Prerequisites: Chemistry Foundations. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Chemistry Applications - Biochemistry

Biochemistry is all about the interplay between life’s chemical underpinnings and it’s biological dynamics. The relationships between these two topics offers us explanations for all of the phenomena that we observe in the natural world.  In this lab based course, students will explore the structure and function of proteins, molecules with critical biological functions in nutrition and metabolism. Other themes will include natural product extraction, exploration of bioactive molecules, and food chemistry.  Students will gain exposure to advanced lab based methodologies such as gel electrophoresis, column chromatography, western blotting and distillation.

Prerequisites: Chemistry Foundations and Biology Foundations. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Chemistry Applications - Physical Chemistry

This interdisciplinary course will explore the physical and chemical properties of matter using two main themes: electron structure and thermodynamics.   Students will cover in this course the challenging fields of thermodynamics, thermal and chemical equilibrium, and quantum mechanics. A thorough understanding of how chemical systems behave will be gained through hands-on laboratory experiences, and students observe how these systems will respond to external stress.    Students will spend the last part of the course discussing advanced electron structures using the principles of quantum mechanics. Throughout the course, lab skills and writing will be emphasized in order to practice effective scientific communication and inquiry-based design challenges.

Prerequisites: Chemistry Foundations and Biology Foundations. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Chemistry Foundations - Atoms and Reactions

Chemistry Foundations covers essential core content, while providing hands-on opportunities for students to learn how to think like a chemist. Students learn to use the language of chemistry to describe physical and chemical changes of matter. They explore atomic structure and theory, ionic and covalent bonding, and the structure and organization of the Periodic Table in order to understand how atoms function both individually and when bonded together. Students begin to develop skills around formalizing scientific research and writing. The course will culminate with a research project that incorporates atomic structures and applications.

Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics A & B or departmental permission. Honors section with departmental permission.

Science: Engineering Design Foundations - Tools and Processes

Engineering Design Foundations is designed as an introductory class that does not depend on any prior knowledge. This course provides a general introductory experience with engineering design, focusing on the creative design process and providing a strong foundation in project work. The topics studied during this term can be tailored to student interest, but will focus on core techniques and tools used in most engineering fields. Topics include the engineering design process, project management, workshop skills, electronics, and coding. This course will have several small projects designed to develop and assess the various engineering skills.

Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th graders.
Prerequisites: None

Science: Forensic Science - CSI BCDS

Forensics is the application of science to solve crimes using evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. A multidisciplinary approach that encourages analytical thinking and problem solving in biology, chemistry, and physics will be used. Students may cover the following topics: deductive reasoning, fingerprinting, qualitative analysis of substances such as fingerprints, blood, DNA, document analysis, and ballistics. Along with lab work, students may do research projects, look at the legal aspects of forensic science, take field trips, and solve mock crimes.

Open to 11th and 12th graders
Prerequisites: Biology Foundations

Science: Physics and Engineering Applications

In this course, students will explore the phenomena of the mechanical world and develop the toolkit and mindset of an engineer. Learners will use their engineering skills and apply their understanding of physics to analyze situations and design new solutions.

This elective explores a selection of physics concepts (based on student interests and experience, ranging from mechanics to E&M to waves), develops foundational engineering and design approaches (ranging from research and documentation to modeling and prototyping to iteration and troubleshooting), and exposes students to a variety of tools (power tools, 3D modeling and printing, laser cutting, coding and arduinos, etc.).

This course is designed for students who (a) would like to explore physics but did not take Conceptual Physics in ninth grade, (b) would like a follow-up course to freshman physics without the mathematical rigor of Advanced Physics, (c) would like an introduction to the tools and techniques of engineering.

Open to 10th, 11th, and 12th graders.

Prerequisites: Algebra II or equivalent.

Visual Art: 2D

Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of materials, tools, and techniques in drawing, painting, printmaking, and collage. Regular discussion of The World of Art and Art History will provide context for our work. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite for 10th to 12th graders.

Visual Art: 3D

Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of materials, tools, and techniques in the intersection of design, craft, and building things that you can use. Regular discussion of The World of Art and Art History will provide context for our work. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite for 10th to 12th graders.

Visual Art: Digital World

Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of tools including Photoshop, Illustrator, Procreate, Autodesk Maya, and experiments in Augmented Reality. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite for 10th to 12th graders.

Visual Art: Photography

Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover the techniques of using a professional camera, editing and manipulating images in photoshop and in the darkroom, printing high resolution large scale images, and going on photo shoots off campus. Regular discussion of The World of Art and Art History will provide context for our work. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite for 10th to 12th graders.

Visual Art: Video Production

Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of techniques in video production using professional video cameras, sound recording, composition and editing to tell a story. Regular screening and analysis of short films from the World of Art, youth media and the commercial world will provide inspiration and context for our work. Collaborations, Critiques, and Screenings will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product.
This class may be taken more than once.

No prerequisite for 10th to 12th graders.


Three Term Courses

These course meet 4 days per week for 3 terms and earn 10 credits.

Modern Language: Arabic I

In Arabic 1, students learn the alphabet as well as the following vocabulary: family, school, furniture, numbers, adjectives, prepositions, country and city vocab and colors. Students meet twice a week to learn how to speak and write Arabic. They work on collaborative projects which include videos, songs and skits. By the end of the year, students can describe themselves, their families, friends and home using written and spoken Arabic. Unlike our other languages, we do not have a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Foundations Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class.

Modern Language: Foundations Arabic

In Foundations Arabic, students learn the present and past tense as well as vocabulary through stories. They work on reading, writing speaking and listening activities.Unlike our other languages, we do not offer a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Foundations Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class. Other students must also be enrolled in a Spanish, French or Chinese in order to fulfill their graduation requirement. Once students progress satisfactorily through Foundations Arabic, ( they may enroll in Intermediate Arabic. Arabic classes will meet twice a week during G-block throughout the school year. Foundations and Intermediate Arabic are 5-credit classes.

Modern Language: Intermediate Arabic

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic. In Intermediate Arabic, students learn the future tense and continue to use the present and past tense with food and home vocabulary. Students continue to challenge themselves with Arabic stories, and they create their own plot twists and presentations based on readings. Unlike our other languages, we do not offer a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Intermediate Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class. Other students must also be enrolled in a Spanish, French or Chinese in order to fulfill their graduation requirement. Arabic classes will meet twice a week during G-block throughout the school year. Foundations and Intermediate Arabic are 5-credit classes.

Performing Arts: Choral - Select Singers (Honors)

Select Singers is an all-year course for experienced singers which aims to advance vocal technique, ensemble skills, and individual musicianship through study and performance of a wide variety of choral repertoire. Students will work in a variety of smaller groups within the ensemble in both sight-reading exercises and sectional rehearsals. Students should be highly motivated and committed to learning music at an accelerated pace and be prepared to sing for public concerts in smaller ensembles. Select Singers will prepare a varied program of repertoire for concerts at the end of each term. This course can be taken more than once. Weekly individual voice lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to their private music lessons.

Three Term Course
Prerequisite: Audition
Open to Grade levels: 10,11,12

Performing Arts: Costume & Fashion Design Studio

Students will develop a basic understanding of the principles of costume and fashion design. Through individual projects, students will be able to explore a wide range of skills and techniques needed to successfully create and visually communicate a design through the use of research, imagery, fabric, texture, shape, color and line. Students will also have opportunities to build from designs. These designs can either be their own work or students can work building costumes for the main stage productions. Techniques students can explore through this process may include sewing, draping, pattern making, tailoring, dyeing, distressing, fabric identification, painting, and craft. Students are given the opportunity to design their own experience based on where their interests lie within costume and fashion design. Current projects include the research, design and construction of a prom dress and fulfilling the role of Design Assistant for the Middle School Musical. This class can be taken more than once.

Three Term Course
No Prerequisite required.
Open to grade levels 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Dance - Choreography Foundations

This course will provide an in-depth study of movement and choreographic tools through the lens of dance as it appears in pop culture (film, live music performance, commercial hip hop, etc). Along with viewing dance through a critical lens, coursework will offer students the opportunity to develop a greater sense of body awareness, self-confidence, and self-discipline by learning how to express emotion and a point of view through movement.Through solo and group projects, students will have the opportunity to put into practice some of those elements of choreography and discover their individual voice as part of their creative process. Coursework will culminate in a final presentation that will include original compositions by the students. This class can be taken more than once.

Three Term Course
No Prerequisite required.
Open to grade levels 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Instrumental - Ikonoclastic

Ikonoclastic is an ensemble for students who identify as female or non-binary and is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). This performing arts course strives to build a strong foundation for the student musician and to expand skills for returning students.. Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills. The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Students should be capable of playing their instrument independently with at least one full year of private lessons and/or ensemble experience. Students who are new to Beaver will be contacted by a faculty member prior to the beginning of the school year to ensure proper ensemble placement. Weekly individual instrumental lessons are not required, but are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Students who are on financial aid at Beaver have the same percentage of aid applied to private lessons.

Three Term Course
Prerequisite: One year experience with private lessons and/or ensemble experience.
Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Technical Theater - Design & Tech Studio

Design & Tech Studio is a course for students interested in Technical Theater and/or Theatrical Design. Students will have the opportunity to design their own experience through a combination of projects and workshops, allowing them to learn and utilize design and production tools as well as carpentry, scenic painting, props, lighting, and sound. Students will explore how theater artists use these tools for creative problem solving and to communicate with audience members. The successful student would gain an understanding of shop and theater safe working practices, basic construction skills, knowledge of lighting and sound instrumentation and rigging, as well as how communication, planning and collaboration are central to the health of a theater production. This course can be taken more than once.

 

Three Term Course

No Prerequisites

Open to Grade Levels: 10,11,12