Two Term Courses

These courses meet two out of three terms and earn 10 credits.

English 9

Throughout both the Power and Perspectives trimesters, students read, write, act, create, listen, watch, wonder, debate, and present; they work independently and collaboratively, use their questions as starting points for their work, and use technology to deepen their learning. Ultimately, they connect the characters and themes to the world today. Readings include fiction, non-fiction, memoir, poetry, and drama, incorporating ancient and contemporary texts that we read as a full class and texts that students read in small groups. Most days start with independent reading or writing, and grammar and vocabulary are integrated into the week.

Power
In this trimester course, we question the nature of power. What is the intersection of power and our characters’ gender, age, race, political beliefs, socio-economic reality, or experience? What is the relationship between power and fate? Why do some characters let power compromise their beliefs while others use their power for good?

Perspectives
Stories teach, challenge, reveal, guide, and inspire us. They push us to explore the human condition through a different lens, and in their most powerful moments, stories help us develop empathy and foster change. In this trimester course, we use stories to understand our world, and in doing so, we re-invent ourselves from English students to curious, engaged readers and writers who seek to understand why people make the choices they do.

Flex Time

9th-grade Flex Time is dedicated to health and wellness programming, academics, and independent time. Flex Time empowers students with access to resources, support, and skills to make informed choices and navigate their lives. 9th Grade Flex Time is made up of three core components: Wellness, Plan, and Independent Time.

Wellness
During Wellness, our goal is to help our students further develop their social and emotional learning skills to help them navigate the content of their lives. Social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process “through which individuals acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.” Our work is intended to empower students to make informed choices and to help them be connected and engaged members of our community. Students participate in targeted workshops on navigating resources, self-care, substance use and addiction, sexuality, and consent and boundaries. They also are exposed to leadership training and college counseling.

Plan
9th graders have a supported environment to plan their days and get work done. It is a time to ask questions, collaborate, seek feedback, get ahead, or catch up if needed.

Independent Time
9th graders can choose how to spend their time. They may meet with teachers or classmates, connect with the Hiatt center, work independently, meet with tutors, take private music lessons, or go to Open Gym, among other things.

Global History I: U.S. History

Nation and Nationalism
If you could build your own nation, what would it be like? In this class, you will have the opportunity to understand how nations are built, how they expand, and how national identity is shaped and cemented through culture, politics, conflict, and division. You will also evaluate the goals of the U.S. as a new nation, its decisions to embrace democracy, and examine how citizens have shaped its course toward these goals since its founding amidst ever-evolving global challenges and opportunities.

The Age of Reforms
From Sectionalism, including Reconstruction, through the suffrage movement, this course examines the root causes of the political, social, economic, and cultural reform movements that have existed in the United States. How successful were those reformers, and how did some of their objectives become part of mainstream political discourse?
Can a true democracy adequately respond to the will of the majority while protecting the rights and interests of all citizens? Using multiple perspectives and sources, you will learn about the people and movements that helped shape the United States and then assess the effectiveness of those movements.

Math: Algebra II A and B

Algebra II is a continuation of symbolic reasoning and understanding of mathematical models from Algebra I. The first term builds on topics such as polynomials and quadratic functions. In the second term, students will extend their algebraic reasoning to include topics such as nonlinear systems of equations, logarithmic functions, and exponential relationships.

Prerequisites: Algebra I or Intermediate Algebra. Offered at the Honors and Standard levels.

Math: Intermediate Algebra

In this course, students will build a strong foundation for Algebra 2 by improving number sense, grappling with a variety of real-world applications, and working extensively with linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, and polynomials. Students will also deepen their understanding of linear and quadratic functions while building their understanding of exponential and rational functions.

Not offered at the Honors level.

Modern Language: Chinese I

This introductory course for Mandarin Chinese is designed for students who have no previous exposure to the language. It stresses the building blocks of spoken and written communication- pronunciation, tones, stroke order and radical recognition. Students will be able to engage in basic daily interactions in Chinese using speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Grammar is introduced incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: introductory greetings, family, dates and time, hobbies, visiting friends, making plans, studying Chinese and school life. Students will also study cultural and historic elements of the Chinese-speaking world. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation. By the end of the first year, students should know approximately 300 words.

Modern Language: French I

This introductory course provides students with the basic skills to read, write, speak and understand introductory-level French. The emphasis of the class is to acquire language through constant exposure to comprehensible input with the use of storytelling and reading. In the second term, the teacher uses French exclusively in class. Vocabulary will be taught communicatively through stories and with some thematic units including greetings, telling time, weather, school, sports, food, making plans, family, and clothing. Grammar will be acquired mainly through listening and reading, although there will be some direct instruction. Students completing this class will be able to comfortably use the present tense of common regular and irregular verbs, articles, subject pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, commands, question formation, possessive adjectives and more.

Modern Language: Spanish I

This introductory course provides students with the basic skills to read, to write, to speak, and to understand introductory-level Spanish. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics discussed include: introductory greetings, friendship, school, sports, leisure activities, food, family, clothing, the home, and health. Grammar is learned incrementally, and the topics introduced include: indefinite and definite articles, subject pronouns, the present tense of regular verbs, the present tense of irregular verbs, adjective agreement and placement, possessive adjectives, direct and indirect objects, and the preterit tense of regular verbs. Students also study aspects of various Spanish-speaking countries. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation.

Performing Arts: Acting - Foundations of Theater

In this introductory course, students will begin the year working on developing the actor’s process through warm-up exercises, rehearsal techniques and games, improvisation and scene work. Students will learn about specific script analysis tools and the design and production aspects of theatre. Practical hands-on stagecraft is taught in the various theaters and theater-related spaces such as the scene shop and control booth. This course meets with the Foundations of Design/Tech Theater class, and it is meant to give students an overview of the major components of theater including acting, technical theater, public speaking, and script analysis. The aim of the course is to prepare students to implement and perform in the Ten-Minute Playfest which is a public production at the end of the spring term.

 

Two Term Course

This course is a prerequisite for students entering the Upper School Theater Program.

Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10

Performing Arts: Choral - B-Side A Cappella

B-Side A Cappella builds on and further develops the skills from A Cappella Foundations while introducing A Cappella vocal arranging and improvisation. Students will begin the course by developing vocal technique through warm-up exercises, reading music, and exploring diverse repertoire. Throughout the course, they will learn how to work independently in smaller groups and will be given leadership opportunities in weekly rehearsals. The aim of the course is to prepare students to arrange and rehearse A Cappella vocal music independently and to perform in public concerts throughout the two terms. This course is a two-term commitment and can be taken more than once.

Two Term Course. Can be taken for 1 Term only if in conjunction with A Cappella Foundations.

Prerequisite: Any Upper School choral ensemble or permission of the instructor.

Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12.

Performing Arts: Instrumental Ensemble I

Instrumental Ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). This performing arts course strives to build a strong foundation for the student musician. Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills. The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Students should be capable of playing their instrument independently with at least one full year of private lessons and/or ensemble experience. Students who are new to Beaver will be contacted by a faculty member prior to the beginning of the school year to ensure proper ensemble placement. Weekly individual lessons on their instruments are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Financial aid information for private lessons is available upon request.

Two Term Course

Prerequisite: One year experience with private lessons and/or ensemble experience.

Open to Grade Levels: 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Instrumental Ensemble II

The Instrumental Ensemble II course builds on and further develops the skills introduced in Instrumental Ensemble I. This ensemble is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills. The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Weekly individual lessons on their instruments are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Financial aid information for private lessons is available upon request.

 

Two Term Course

Prerequisite: Instrumental Ensemble I, Ikonoclastic or placement audition.

Open to Grade Levels: 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Technical Theater - Foundations of Design/Tech Theater

In this introductory course, students will begin the year using design projects and games, practical activities and scene work to develop storytelling skills. Students will learn about the design and production aspects of theatre and specific script analysis tools. Practical hands-on stagecraft is taught in the various theaters and theater-related spaces such as the scene shop and control booth. This course meets with the Foundations of Theater class, and it is meant to give students an overview of the major components of theater including acting, technical theater, public speaking, and script analysis. The aim of the course is to prepare students to implement and perform in the Ten-Minute Playfest which is a public production at the end of the spring term.

Two Term Course

This course is a prerequisite for students entering the Upper School Theater Program.

Open to Grade Levels: 9,10

Science: Conceptual Physics

Conceptual Physics A
A student’s first upper school science course at Beaver, Conceptual Physics is a two-term course that introduces many of the major skills and themes of science through collaborative investigations and design challenges. The first term uses a hands-on approach to develop an understanding basic kinematics and dynamics while emphasizing problem-solving, collaboration, experimentation, data analysis, communication of ideas, and more.
Prerequisites: None. Open to 9th graders only.

Conceptual Physics B
In the second term of physics, students will continue exploring Newton’s Laws, energy, and electricity. An emphasis is placed on the application of ideas to real-world situations as students explore physics principles through experimentation, design challenges and projects, and conceptual and quantitative models. Students will explore physics concepts (both conceptually and mathematically) and apply these concepts to projects throughout the term.
Prerequisites: None. Open to 9th graders only. Honors level offered only with departmental permission.

Visual Art

In this class you will have the opportunity to work in all the visual art studios and with all the visual art faculty. Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of materials, tools, and techniques. Regular discussion of The World of Art and Art History will provide context for our work. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. Try something new or pursue your lifelong passion.

 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite


One Term Courses

These courses meet one term, Fall, Winter, or Spring and earn 5 credits each. English and history students seeking Honors designation sign contracts in the first term of next year to earn that credit.

Modern Language: Foundations of Chinese

Foundations of Chinese builds on students’ basic proficiency established in Chinese I. Students may enroll in this course having demonstrated proficiency equivalent to completion a full-year high school course. This course will continue to develop students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Grammar is studied incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: hobbies, weather, dining, celebrations, shopping and asking for directions. Students will continue to study the culture of the Chinese-speaking world in the form of language use, traditions and current events. Audio and video materials along with computer software, games, projects, and presentations will be used to foster student interaction and participation.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Chinese I skills and Departmental Permission Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Make a Good First Impression: Students will learn to introduce themselves in culturally appropriate ways and learn about formal and informal speech.

Friends from the Start: Students will learn vocabulary related to background information, hobbies, leisure time and celebrations.

Everyday Life: Students will get a chance to compare their life to that of teens in China and around the world today. By the end of the term, students should be comfortable describing their daily lives, from routines and schedules, to hobbies and habits.

Modern Language: Foundations of French

In Foundations of French, students will continue to develop their language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Vocabulary will be taught through stories and accessible texts chosen around the themes of each one-term class. The class will be driven by comprehensible input; in other words, listening and reading that is understandable. Through readings and research students will also expand their cultural understanding of France and the Francophone world. Students completing this class will be able to comfortably use verbs in the passé composé and imperfect, direct and indirect pronouns, reflexive verbs, some relative pronouns and negative expressions. Students will show the language that they can produce creatively through writing assignments, videos and projects.
Prerequisites: French 1 or equivalent and Departmental Permission Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

The Marketplace: Students will develop their oral and written skills in French as they learn about the buying and selling of goods in the French speaking world. From groceries and clothing to hotels and restaurants, students will learn to barter, compare and contrast. Students will learn vocabulary related to groceries, ingredients and cooking. They will also learn about typical prepared foods that can be found in the marketplaces of francophone countries.

Everyday Life: Students will get a chance to compare their lives to those of French and Francophone teens today. By the end of the term, students should be comfortable describing their daily lives, from simple morning routines to hobbies and habits.

Social Life: Students will learn how to get to know people better through more in-depth conversations about their backgrounds and interests. They will practice necessary skills and vocabulary to plan outings, pay visits, or invite friends over for homemade meals.

Modern Language: Foundations of Spanish

In this course, students will continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way. Grammar is learned incrementally, and the topics that are discussed include: the present progressive tense, direct and indirect object pronouns, estar + adjectives, reflexive verbs, verbs like gustar, comparatives and superlatives, the imperfect tense and the preterite tense. Students will study the culture of the Spanish-speaking world in the form of language use, customs, celebrations, art, historical figures, and current contributors to Latin American and Spanish society.
Prerequisites: Spanish 1 or equivalent and Departmental Permission Required.

Social Life: Students will study vocabulary related to family, friends and social life in the Spanish-speaking world. Students will build their communication skills as they tell stories about family and friends.

Cuisine & Culture: Students will learn vocabulary related to groceries, ingredients and the kitchen. They will learn different expressions as well as units of measurement used in Spanish-speaking countries. They will also learn about the typical gastronomy of different countries.

Customs and Celebrations:In this course, students will explore different traditions and celebrations practiced in Spanish-speaking countries. They will also learn to talk about their own customs in their families and from their childhood. This course focuses on traditions and customs of Mexico, as well as one of its famous artists, Frida Kahlo, reading a level-appropriate biography in Spanish.

Travel & Tourism:In this course, students will learn about important historic places in Spanish-speaking countries, both in Urban and rural environments. Through this exploration students will also learn valuable skills and vocabulary for traveling and navigating through new places in Spanish.

Home LifeIn this course, students read a novel called Bianca Nieves y sus siete toritos, which is about the life of a girl growing up in Spain whose father is a torero. They learn to understand Bianca’s complicated home life. In addition, students learn about different cultural aspects of Spain, including, but not limited to the controversy around bullfighting.

Modern Language: Intermediate Chinese

In Intermediate Chinese, students continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater autonomy with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Grammar is studied incrementally through storytelling as functional chunks for meaningful communication. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way, and the topics that are discussed include: making recommendations, giving directions, expressing doubt and certainty, and expressing opinions. Students will study the culture and diversity of the Chinese-speaking world in the form of culturally rich images, videos, music, and some authentic texts. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, skits and presentations foster student interaction and participation.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of Chinese skills and Departmental Permission Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

Home, School and Work: Students will learn to talk about their life at home, school and their plans for their future education and careers. They will learn the necessary vocabulary to express their likes and dislikes concerning their present life, education and future goals.

Meeting Our Needs:Students will discover vocabulary related to people’s feelings, physical and mental states, courses of actions and routines. They will also learn about people’s lifestyles and customs in China and other Chinese-speaking regions.

Social Life: Students will learn how to get to know people better through more in-depth conversations about their backgrounds and interests. They will practice necessary skills and vocabulary to plan outings, pay visits, or invite friends over for homemade meals.

Modern Language: Intermediate French

In Intermediate French, students will improve their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater autonomy with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Vocabulary is acquired through exposure to authentic texts and communicative practice, and the topics that are explored include: making recommendations, expressing doubt and certainty, and expressing opinions. Grammar is refined incrementally. Students will learn a few more tenses while refining their written and oral communication. The class will use more authentic texts and documents from the Francophone world to guide both language learning and discussions. Students will study culture and diversity in the form of current events, film, music, and famous novels and stories.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of French skills and Departmental Permission Required.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.

France: A Nation of Regions: As a country, France is known for, among many other things, its cheese and gastronomy; but each dish and each cheese comes from its own distinct region. What makes a country roughly the size of Texas have so many distinct regions with their own distinct cultures? In this class we will look at the regions of France and see what makes them unique and proud including gastronomy, art, poetry, music, literature and history. We will look at the French idea of terroir and why the foods from one area are unique to that area and cannot be reproduced elsewhere. The class will also look at how the French government and the regions themselves attempt to preserve their cultural heritage in the face of a changing world and globalization.

Action and Romance: This course will use the abbreviated version of the classic play “Cyrano de Bergerac.” The story will act as a starting point, allowing students to build mastery in the future and conditional tenses by reworking and re-imagining the tale. Additionally, students will be exposed to new tenses and review the past tense.

Mystery and suspense: This course will use the abbreviated version of ‘The Phantom of The Opera’ and other French stories. Students will use these stories to review the past tense and learn the future and conditional tenses while working on their speaking, pronunciation, listening, reading and writing skills. Students will work on plot twists of the stories and create their own mystery and suspense stories using film, audio and other media forms.

Technology In Our Lives: Students will be introduced to the vocabulary of technology and social media. Additionally, students will be given the opportunity to research and discuss how technology and social media have affected our everyday life, the factors that have allowed for recent technological advances, as well as any moral and ethical implications. Student created products will include both written and oral communication using different platforms, allowing for a thorough review of foundational grammar, as well as future and conditional tenses.

Modern Language: Intermediate Spanish

In Intermediate Spanish, students continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At this level, students have greater independence with the language and are encouraged to use it creatively and authentically. Vocabulary is acquired in a thematic and communicative way. Grammar is practiced incrementally, and the topics that are practiced include: preterite and imperfect, familiar, formal and nosotros commands, future and conditional, present subjunctive. Students also study the culture of the Spanish-speaking world in the form of authentic literature, historical and literary figures, customs, celebrations, and music. Audio and video materials, Skype conferences, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation.
Course topics are briefly outlined below.
Prerequisites: Demonstration of mastery of Foundations of Spanish skills and Departmental Permission Required.

Health & Wellness:In this course, students will explore health-related topics including cultural context of food, access to healthcare, physical exercise, emotional well-being, and the importance of meditation and maintaining a healthy balance with technology. Through the novel that students read called Vida o muerte en el Cusco, students learn about medical emergencies, as well as what it is like to travel through Peru.

Identity in the 21st Century: In this course, students will explore their identities in the past, present, and future. They will do this by working with various themes such as important events in one’s past, dreams for the future, and communicating identity, as they establish what it means to be an individual in the 21st century.

Urban Life:In this course, students will explore various aspects of life in the city. Students will examine how topics such as pollution, accessibility, and migration shape urban settings. Students will also reflect on the causes and consequences of gentrification around the world and in our local communities

Storytelling: In this course, students will explore aspects of storytelling including short stories, journalism, poetry, and oral histories and the art of the interview.

Business & Entrepreneurship: In this course, students will explore the various aspects of business and entrepreneurship through themes such as advertisement, consumerism, and how Hispanic and Latinx businesses shape communities. Students will have the opportunity to use the tools in the R+D center to create and market a product.

Contemporary Artists of the Spanish-Speaking World:In this course, students will explore art through various modes such as music and visual art produced by contemporary Spanish-speaking artists. They will work closely with these works and use them to develop their own artistic voice.

Performing Arts: Choral - A Cappella Foundations

A Cappella Foundations will introduce students to the fundamentals of a cappella singing, including vocal technique, music literacy, and artistic expression. Students will begin the term working on developing their voices through warm-up exercises, vocal improvisation, and music reading. They will also cultivate a working knowledge of fundamental music theory. Throughout the course, students will learn how to listen for tuning and ensemble blend during rehearsal. The aim of the course is to develop confident musicians and prepare for a public concert at the end of the term.

One Term Course

Prerequisite: No prerequisite

Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12

Performing Arts: Choral - B-Side A Cappella

B-Side A Cappella builds on and further develops the skills from A Cappella Foundations while introducing A Cappella vocal arranging and improvisation. Students will begin the course by developing vocal technique through warm-up exercises, reading music, and exploring diverse repertoire. Throughout the course, they will learn how to work independently in smaller groups and will be given leadership opportunities in weekly rehearsals. The aim of the course is to prepare students to arrange and rehearse A Cappella vocal music independently and to perform in public concerts throughout the two terms. This course is a two-term commitment and can be taken more than once.

Two Term Course. Can be taken for 1 Term only if in conjunction with A Cappella Foundations.

Prerequisite: Any Upper School choral ensemble or permission of the instructor.

Open to Grade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12.

Visual Art

In this class you will have the opportunity to work in all the visual art studios and with all the visual art faculty. Identify your own artistic interests, build on past creative experiences, and develop the technical skills you need to make your ideas visible. Instruction will cover a range of materials, tools, and techniques. Regular discussion of The World of Art and Art History will provide context for our work. Critiques, documentation, and presentation will be essential elements of the class, with an emphasis on both process and product. Try something new or pursue your lifelong passion.

 

This class may be taken more than once. No prerequisite


Three Term Courses

These courses meet 4 days per week for 3 terms and earn 10 credits.

Modern Language: Arabic I

In Arabic 1, students learn the alphabet as well as the following vocabulary: family, school, furniture, numbers, adjectives, prepositions, country and city vocab and colors. Students meet twice a week to learn how to speak and write Arabic. They work on collaborative projects which include videos, songs and skits. By the end of the year, students can describe themselves, their families, friends and home using written and spoken Arabic. Unlike our other languages, we do not have a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Foundations Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class.

Modern Language: Foundations Arabic

In Foundations Arabic, students learn the present and past tense as well as vocabulary through stories. They work on reading, writing speaking and listening activities.Unlike our other languages, we do not offer a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Foundations Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class. Other students must also be enrolled in a Spanish, French or Chinese in order to fulfill their graduation requirement. Once students progress satisfactorily through Foundations Arabic, ( they may enroll in Intermediate Arabic. Arabic classes will meet twice a week during G-block throughout the school year. Foundations and Intermediate Arabic are 5-credit classes.

Modern Language: Intermediate Arabic

A continuation of Intermediate Arabic. In Intermediate Arabic, students learn the future tense and continue to use the present and past tense with food and home vocabulary. Students continue to challenge themselves with Arabic stories, and they create their own plot twists and presentations based on readings. Unlike our other languages, we do not offer a full 3-year program in Arabic. This means that Intermediate Arabic is open to any student, but only students who have fulfilled their language requirement may take Arabic as their only language class. Other students must also be enrolled in a Spanish, French or Chinese in order to fulfill their graduation requirement. Arabic classes will meet twice a week during G-block throughout the school year. Foundations and Intermediate Arabic are 5-credit classes.

Performing Arts: Costume & Fashion Design Studio

Students will develop a basic understanding of the principles of costume design and costume technology through the use of imagery, fabric, texture, shape, color and line to support and inform the theatrical storytelling process. Through a series of projects and mainstage shows students will explore how character and story can be revealed through clothing. Students will also explore the skills and techniques needed to then create the designs that best support their ideas. These techniques may include sewing, draping, pattern making, tailoring, dyeing, distressing, painting, and craft. This course can be taken more than once.

Three Term Course

No Prerequisite required

Open to Grade Levels: 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Dance - Choreography Foundations

This course will provide an in-depth study of movement and choreographic tools through the lens of dance as it appears in pop culture (film, live music performance, commercial hip hop, etc). Coursework will offer students the opportunity to develop a greater sense of body awareness, self-confidence, and self-discipline by learning how to express emotion and a point of view through movement. Students interested in composition work will have the opportunity to apply the elements of choreography introduced in class and discover their individual voice as part of their creative process. Coursework will culminate in a final presentation which may include original compositions by the students.

Three Term Course

No Prerequisite required.

Open to Grade Levels 9,10,11,12

Performing Arts: Instrumental - Ikonoclastic

Ikonoclastic is an ensemble for students who identify as female or non-binary and is open to all instruments including strings, woodwinds, brass and rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, percussion). This performing arts course strives to build a strong foundation for the student musician and to expand skills for returning students.. Students will study and play a wide range of repertoire with a focus on building technical skills while exploring the cultural and historical context of the repertoire. This course utilizes components from the classical music traditions as well as contemporary styles such as jazz and blues as vehicles to develop students’ technique and creative processes. Class material will integrate music theory, instrumental technique, rehearsal/performance skills, and improvisation skills. The ensemble will perform in formal mandatory concerts throughout the year. Students should be capable of playing their instrument independently with at least one full year of private lessons and/or ensemble experience. Students who are new to Beaver will be contacted by a faculty member prior to the beginning of the school year to ensure proper ensemble placement. Weekly individual lessons on their instruments are available on campus to students for an additional fee. Financial aid information for private lessons is available upon request.

Prerequisite: One year experience with private lessons and/or ensemble experience.

Open to Grade Levels: 9,10,11,12